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Virginia’s public health officials announced Tuesday morning that the state will temporarily stop administering doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, following reports of very rare but severe blood clots.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a statement early Tuesday recommending the pause. “This is important, in part, to ensure that the health care provider community is aware of the potential for these adverse events and can plan for proper recognition and management due to the unique treatment required with this type of blood clot,” the agencies said.

An advisory committee will convene on Wednesday to investigate six cases of blood clots within two weeks after receiving the vaccine. According to a statement released by the Food and Drug administration, “All six cases occurred among women between the ages of 18 and 48, and symptoms occurred 6 to 13 days after vaccination.”

Latest numbers from the CDC show that more than 6.8 million Americans have gotten the Johnson & Johnson shot. The Richmond Times-Dispatch on Tuesday morning cited a UC San Diego Health Study that found COVID-19 disease is far more likely — about 20 percent more likely — to cause a dangerous blood clotting disorder than any COVID-19 vaccine currently authorized in the U.S.

Nevertheless, in an abundance of caution, Dr. Danny Avula, Virginia’s vaccine coordinator, delivered a statement on Tuesday announcing the temporary pause on administering Johnson & Johnson doses.

“We are closely monitoring the actions by the federal government to pause all Johnson & Johnson vaccinations while it investigates an extremely rare possible side effect,” Avula said. “In Virginia, we will cease all Johnson & Johnson vaccines until this investigation is complete. If you have an upcoming appointment for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, you will be contacted to reschedule that appointment.

“This pause is reassuring in that it demonstrates that the systems that are in place to monitor vaccine safety are working,” Avula continued. “We look forward to a thorough review by federal health officials. Meantime, we will continue Virginia’s vaccine rollout at this time with the other two authorized vaccines, developed by Pfizer and Moderna.”

Virginia puts J&J vaccine on hold, CDC investigates reports of rare blood clots 

 

By Rachel Needham Rappahannock News Staff

 

Virginia’s public health officials announced Tuesday morning that the state will temporarily stop administering doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, following reports of very rare but severe blood clots.

 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a statement early Tuesday recommending the pause. “This is important, in part, to ensure that the health care provider community is aware of the potential for these adverse events and can plan for proper recognition and management due to the unique treatment required with this type of blood clot,” the agencies said. 

 

An advisory committee will convene on Wednesday to investigate six cases of blood clots within two weeks after receiving the vaccine. According to a statement released by the Food and Drug administration, “All six cases occurred among women between the ages of 18 and 48, and symptoms occurred 6 to 13 days after vaccination.”

 

Latest numbers from the CDC show that more than 6.8 million Americans have gotten the Johnson & Johnson shot. The Richmond Times-Dispatch on Tuesday morning cited a UC San Diego Health Study that found COVID-19 disease is far more likely — about 20 percent more likely — to cause a dangerous blood clotting disorder than any COVID-19 vaccine currently authorized in the U.S.  

 

Nevertheless, in an abundance of caution, Dr. Danny Avula, Virginia’s vaccine coordinator, delivered a statement on Tuesday announcing the temporary pause on administering Johnson & Johnson doses. 

 

“We are closely monitoring the actions by the federal government to pause all Johnson & Johnson vaccinations while it investigates an extremely rare possible side effect,” Avula said. “In Virginia, we will cease all Johnson & Johnson vaccines until this investigation is complete. If you have an upcoming appointment for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, you will be contacted to reschedule that appointment.

 

“This pause is reassuring in that it demonstrates that the systems that are in place to monitor vaccine safety are working,” Avula continued. “We look forward to a thorough review by federal health officials. Meantime, we will continue Virginia’s vaccine rollout at this time with the other two authorized vaccines, developed by Pfizer and Moderna.”

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