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Prince William County honored Maj. Eduardo Caraveo at Memorial Day ceremonies by adding his name to the Roll of Honor at the Government Complex, Friday. Caraveo, an Army psychiatrist, was killed with 13 other soldiers during a terrorist attack in Fort Hood, Texas.

This Memorial Day weekend is a somber time for many families, thinking about loved ones who won’t be coming home. That is the case for Angela Rivera, whose husband, Woodbridge doctor and Army Maj. Eduardo Caraveo, lost his life while trying to help service members in distress. 

Caraveo was born in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, in 1957, and came to El Paso as a teenager. He later graduated from the University of Texas at El Paso, continuing his education with a Master’s and then a doctoral degree in psychology – the first in his family to earn a college degree. 

Yesli Vega, Prince William Coles District supervisor, said Caraveo was continually driven to help others during a gathering Friday to add his name to the black granite “Roll of Honor” at the county government complex.

“Major Caraveo’s humble beginnings in Juarez gave him an appreciation for people, and an ability to look at obstacles as a challenge to grow and to do better. He believed in education, and that hard work always pays off. He believed that everyone had the ability to break through boundaries, as he was a boundary-breaker himself,” Vega said.

Caraveo worked for the Federal Bureau of Prisons for more than 15 years, and his work took him to Arizona, Pennsylvania, California and Northern Virginia, where he lived and had a private practice as a clinical psychologist right here in Prince William County,.

“His passion was to help people, and he made it a point to help others in need,” Vega said.

At the age of 42, Vega said Caraveo felt the call to serve his nation, and joined the Army Reserve. A decade later, while Caraveo was preparing for his first overseas deployment, to help soldiers deal with the stresses of war, he was tragically shot and killed with 13 other service members by another Army psychiatrist during an attack at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

“All of you who knew him knew he was a giving person, and all he wanted to do was to love and help people,” Rivera said of her husband. “I also want to honor the families that have lost someone, because this weekend is a hard weekend for a lot of people. It is not about picnics, and about hot dogs. It’s for those that made the ultimate sacrifice, and the pain and sorrow of those left behind.” 

Prince William County Neabsco District Supervisor Victor Angry, dressed in his Army Command sergeant major blues, said adding Caraveo’s name to  the memorial honoring those who sacrificed their lives for their country is also honoring those who continue to serve. 

“We remember and honor Maj. Eduardo Caraveo and all those who bravely made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. We honor the men and women around the world who still serve our nation, and who are willing, at any moment, to put their lives on the line for this great country,” Angry said. “We hope and pray that all our Armed Forces from Prince William County and those serving throughout the world stay safe, and soon return to their families and their loved ones.” 

“In honor of Edwardo, all I can say is to love, laugh and live today, because tomorrow we don’t know. Today is all we have,” said Rivera. 

Paul Lara covers the military beat. Reach him at plara@insidenova.com

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Paul Benedict

On very rare occasions this board will actually do something I support.

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